A well-proportioned body atop a flared solid wood base. Rhombus-shaped patterns on the surface in different veneers; effect of flowing over the table edge produced. Bronze drawers with ebony handles are the defining features of the front.

A sleek plain familiar shape with a wink in its expression.

A sleek plain familiar shape with a wink in its expression.

A versatile and quirky piece with a surface in ultra-matt HPL, a leather-clad drawer with shiny lacquer finish, hand-cut and veneer patterned. Brings a smile to any type of room.

 

Pug’s brother, but a bit more mature. Appears to walk from a side view. Displayed here in ultra-matt white exterior, veneer front consisting of darkened oak and tineo with high-gloss lacquer finish.

 

A traditional design consisting of bedhead / base and bedrail. Pillars of black solid ebony.

Leather stripes in harmony with the solid ash frame.

 

Utilitarian design in stunning, luxurious materials. Body with semi-gloss lacquer finish covers the doors, mirror polished by hand, elegant veneers, brass bar to the front and two-drawer interior.

An open space is integrated into the back and upper area of the armoire and can thus be used as a divider.

 

 

A twist to a classic piece - this modern-shaped body comprises hand-cut veneer and is designed using classic marquetry techniques. This solitary dresser works best as a standalone piece. The brass front is finished with butterfly ebony handles.

A twist to a classic piece - this modern-shaped body comprises hand-cut veneer and is designed using classic marquetry techniques. This solitary dresser works best as a standalone piece. The brass front is finished with butterfly ebony handles.

Interaction between materials and techniques

hand-cut marquetry in combination with a super opaque nanotech material. Synergy of qualities:

matt versus reflection, high-tech versus traditional craft.

 

Johannes Hock

Carpenter, architect, designer

 

Designers will never fully understand their creations unless they get involved at a physical level. At some point designers must start thinking with their hands to ensure that the aesthetic and functional potential of the design is realised to the maximum.

 

According to Johannes Hock: “In short, designers must get their hands dirty a bit more often. We can only benefit if we understand that there is no difference between creating and thinking. The old Florentine masters knew this. And so too did the founders of the Bauhaus movement.”

 

Johannes learned to think with his hands during his apprenticeship as a cabinet-maker in the early nineties in Aschaffenburg. At that time, he also learned the value and satisfaction associated with high-quality craftsmanship.

 

 

 

After completing his apprenticeship, Johannes studied architecture at the Technical University of Darmstadt, graduating in 2000.

 

Subsequent years saw Johannes run the fashion label goyagoya along with his wife, the renowned fashion designer, Elena Zenero. He has designed outlets in Frankfurt, Milan and Zurich as well as trade fair stands and furniture for this label.

 

Since 2012 his focus has been on his own furniture series. He lives in Frankfurt am Main in Germany.

An Ode to Ornamental Geometry

 

Throughout history and culture, decorative art has identified basic geometrical shapes as a powerful toolkit for the development of ornamental systems. Some might even make the bold claim that the discovery (or invention) of primary geometrical shapes and their variability actually triggered the first ornamental systems.

 

While the first ornamental systems enjoyed plain repetition, more modern ornamentation sought out the full complexity of geometrically-constructed ornamental systems.

 

 

 

Nevertheless, the simplicity of basic shapes that are linked together in repetition still impresses onlookers and creators alike through strength in form, harmonious humility and the staggering number of potential combinations.

 

In his new furniture line, Johannes Hock uses the appeal of repetitive design and seeks to explore its potential for complexity by disrupting the geometrical code with seemingly random “cut-outs from nature”.

 

By impulsively recombining these “cut-outs from nature”, we are shown man’s desire to see nature submit.

Johannes Hock

Stiftstraße 32

60313 Frankfurt am Main

+49 (0) 172 66 42 393

johannes@johanneshock.com

www.johanneshock.com

 

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MMXV COPYRIGHT Johannes Hock

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